Educational Articles

Cats + Treatment

  • Heartworms are a blood-borne parasite called Dirofilaria immitis that reside in the heart or adjacent large blood vessels of infected animals. There is no drug approved for treating heartworms in cats. Veterinarians now strongly recommend that all cats receive year-round monthly heartworm preventative in areas where mosquitoes are active all year round.

  • Your veterinarian may prescribe rectal medication if your pet is unable to swallow oral medications or if a specific required medication cannot be effectively absorbed with oral delivery. The rectal tissues contain large numbers of blood vessels very close to their surface, which means that medications delivered to this area are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. Rectal medication is most commonly used to treat seizures.

  • Medicated shampoos may be prescribed for a variety of skin conditions. These baths should be performed in an area that is comfortably warm, using lukewarm water. Medicated shampoo should be applied to a clean, wet coat, so start out by thoroughly rinsing your cat with lukewarm water. Shampoo should be worked into the coat thoroughly and allowed to sit for 10 minutes prior to rinsing, unless directed otherwise by your veterinarian.

  • Ibuprofen is commonly used to treat fever, pain, and inflammation in humans. Ibuprofen poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of ibuprofen, either through misuse or by accident. Ibuprofen poisoning causes many different clinical signs because many different organ systems can be affected. Most commonly, cats show signs related to kidney problems.

  • There are many possible causes of infertility in female cats, including behavioral, physical, and medical factors. Your veterinarian will perform a thorough examination and testing to diagnose the reason for your female cat's infertility, and treatment will depend on the underlying cause.

  • There are many possible causes of infertility in male cats, including behavioral, genetic, physical, and medical factors. Your veterinarian will perform a thorough examination and testing to diagnose the reason for your male cat's infertility, and treatment will depend on the underlying cause.

  • Osteoarthritis is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. Although dramatically under-recognized, OA is actually one of the most common chronic diseases of cats. In addition to diet modifications, exercise, weight loss, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, management strategies for OA may include a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug such as PSGAG. PSGAG is a disease modifying agent that slows cartilage destruction, promotes cartilage healing, and helps lubricate the joints. It is given as a series of injections that can be given by an owner at home. A positive response is expected at the end of the first course of treatment. Injections are typically used long-term as PSGAG is well-tolerated by most cats.

  • The nasolacrimal system consists of a series of narrow tubes that allow tears to drain from the eye. This system allows excess tears to drain from the eye to the nose and mouth. In some cats, this nasolacrimal duct can become obstructed. Most affected cats have excessive watering of the eyes, or reddish-colored tear staining of the face.

  • Milk thistle is an herbal remedy that has been used for around 2000 years in the treatment of various health concerns. The Latin name for milk thistle is Silybum marianum. The active ingredient of milk thistle is a flavinoid called silymarin that is found in the seeds. Most herbal preparations contain extracts that are derived from crushed seeds and are standardized to contain a specific concentration of silymarin.

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.